Sedation services - Pediatric Dental offices of Northeast Children's Dentistry

Local Anesthesia
Nitrous Oxide
Conscious Sedation
Outpatient General Anesthesia

Local Anesthesia

Smiling girl with hatHaving Local Anesthesia

Yes, this an area where we will discuss the dreaded "shot." Local anesthetic is what we use to get your child "numb". It is historically known as Novocain but we now use a different, more effective anesthetic. We try to never use the "S" word to our patients. The doctors or staff usually will answer a child's question of "am I getting a shot?" with "we are going to put your tooth to sleep". The dental chairs in our facilities are call "pedo benches" which not only allow the patients to just hop on but, they also have a special opening where their head fits. This opening naturally tips the chin so when a syringe is passed from assistant to Doctor for an injection, the child does not see the syringe.

The application of a topical anesthetic, a pleasant tasting gel is applied with a q-tip helps to minimize discomfort of a needle penetration. The local anesthetic is then injected to block any uncomfortable sensations your child may feel during an appointment. Though many parents are apprehensive about how their child will react to an injection, we ask that you not to talk about it prior to your child's visit as most parents are pleasantly surprised when their child finishes the appointment and never realized they received a "shot".

Care of the mouth after local anesthesia:

Nitrous Oxide

Some children are given nitrous oxide/oxygen, or what you may know as laughing gas, to relax them for their dental treatment. Nitrous oxide/oxygen is a blend of two gases, oxygen and nitrous oxide. Nitrous oxide/oxygen is given through a small breathing mask which is placed over the child’s nose, allowing them to relax, but without putting them to sleep. The American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry, recognizes this technique as a very safe, effective technique to use for treating children’s dental needs. The gas is mild, easily taken, then with normal breathing, it is quickly eliminated from the body. It is non-addictive. While inhaling nitrous oxide/oxygen, your child remains fully conscious and keeps all natural reflexes.

Prior to your appointment:



Conscious Sedation

Conscious Sedation is recommended for apprehensive children, very young children, and children with special needs. It is used to calm your child and to reduce the anxiety or discomfort associated with dental treatments. Your child may be quite drowsy, and may even fall asleep, but they will not become unconscious.

There are a variety of different medications, which can be used for conscious sedation. The doctor will prescribe the medication best suited for your child’s overall health and dental treatment recommendations. We will be happy to answer any questions you might have concerning the specific drugs we plan to give to your child.

Prior to your appointment:

After the sedation appointment:

Outpatient General Anesthesia

Outpatient General Anesthesia is recommended for apprehensive children, very young children, and children with special needs that would not work well under conscious sedation or I.V. sedation. General anesthesia renders your child completely asleep. This would be the same as if he/she was having their tonsils removed, ear tubes, or hernia repaired. This is performed in a hospital or outpatient setting only. While the assumed risks are greater than that of other treatment options, if this is suggested for your child, the benefits of treatment this way have been deemed to outweigh the risks. Most pediatric medical literature places the risk of a serious reaction in the range of 1 in 25,000 to 1 in 200,000, far better than the assumed risk of even driving a car daily. The inherent risks if this is not chosen are multiple appointments, potential for physical restraint to complete treatment and possible emotional and/or physical injury to your child in order to complete their dental treatment. The risks of NO treatment include tooth pain, infection, swelling, the spread of new decay, damage to their developing adult teeth and possible life threatening hospitalization from a dental infection.

Prior to your appointment:

After the appointment:

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